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Antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral effects of three essential oil blends -- Dragonfly Kingdom Library

Posted on December 4, 2020 at 12:50 AM Comments comments (0)




New agents that are effective against common pathogens are needed particularly for those resistant to conventional antimicrobial agents. Essential oils (EOs) are known for their antimicrobial activity. Using the broth microdilution method, we showed that (1) two unique blends of Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Daucus carota, Eucalyptus globulus and Rosmarinus officinalis EOs (AB1 and AB2; cinnamon EOs from two different suppliers) were active against the fourteen Gram‐positive and ‐negative bacteria strains tested, including some antibiotic‐resistant strains. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranged from 0.01% to 3% v/v with minimal bactericidal concentrations from <0.01% to 6.00% v/v; (2) a blend of Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Daucus carota, Syzygium aromaticum, Origanum vulgare EOs was antifungal to the six Candida strains tested, with MICs ranging from 0.01% to 0.05% v/v with minimal fungicidal concentrations from 0.02% to 0.05% v/v. Blend AB1 was also effective against H1N1 and HSV1 viruses. With this dual activity, against H1N1 and against S. aureus and S. pneumoniae notably, AB1 may be interesting to treat influenza and postinfluenza bacterial pneumonia infections. These blends could be very useful in clinical practice to combat common infections including those caused by microorganisms resistant to antimicrobial drugs.

 

1. Introduction

Antimicrobial resistance poses a serious threat to the effective treatment of an ever‐increasing range of infections caused by bacteria, fungi and viruses. Worldwide, antibiotic resistance is increasing. For example, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae have reported reduced antibiotic susceptibility, which exceeded 50% in most countries that provided data to the WHO Antimicrobial Resistance Global Report on Surveillance (WHO, 2014). Candidiasis has also become substantially problematic, with Candida albicans showing increased resistance to common antifungal agents (Goncalves, Souza, Chowdhary, Meis, & Colombo, 2016; Hawser & Douglas, 1995). The recent pandemic of a novel H1N1 influenza viral strain and emerging strains resistant to commonly used anti‐herpes simplex drugs also emphasizes the need to identify effective approaches to prevent and treat viral infections (Boivin, 2013; James & Prichard, 2014).

 

This increasing resistance has created a need to develop new antimicrobial agents. Essential oils (EOs) are good candidates as studies have shown that individual EOs and their isolated compounds, including terpenes and terpenoids (1,8‐cineole, carvacrol) and aromatic compounds (cinnamaldehyde and eugenol) have antimicrobial activity against a wide range of pathogens, with various spectrums of activity (Bassole & Juliani, 2012; Friedman, Henika, & Mandrell, 2002; Jantan, Karim Moharam, Santhanam, & Jamal, 2008). The antimicrobial effects of EOs are linked to their composition and cytotoxic effects, which cause cell membrane damage. EO compounds are lipophilic, and so pass through the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane. They disrupt the structure of the polysaccharide, fatty acid, and phospholipid layers, making the membrane permeable (Bakkali, Averbeck, Averbeck, & Idaomar, 2008). Unfortunately, EOs do not specifically target pathogens; they can also affect eukaryotic cells in a reversible or irreversible manner (Carson, Hammer, & Riley, 2006). In extreme cases, EO cytotoxicity can lead to apoptosis, necrosis, and organ failure (Tisserand & Young, 2013). Therefore, EOs have to be used carefully, within the daily intake limits defined by the relevant authorities when available (EMEA and HMPC 2010, 2011; FAO and WHO 2003).

 

Three different EO blends were formulated, taking into account the specific activity of each. The first two (AB1 and AB2) contained EOs from Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Daucus carota, Eucalyptus globulus, and Rosmarinus officinalis, which differed only in that the cinnamon EOs were provided by two different suppliers. These EOs were selected for their antibacterial effects that had been observed, either individually or in pairs, in previously published studies (for review see Bassole & Juliani, 2012). Eucalyptus globulus and Cinnamomum Zeylanicum EOs also have been reported to have antiviral activity (Astani, Reichling, & Schnitzler, 2010; Cermelli, Fabio, Fabio, & Quaglio, 2008; Vimalanathan & Hudson, 2014). The third blend (AF) contained EOs from Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Daucus carota, Syzygium aromaticum, Origanum vulgare, which are known for their antifungal activity (Khan & Ahmad, 2011; Pinto, Vale‐Silva, Cavaleiro, & Salgueiro, 2009; Tavares et al., 2008; Zore, Thakre, Jadhav, & Karuppayil, 2011).

 

The antibacterial activity of AB1 and AB2 was evaluated in vitro against a selection of Gram‐positive and Gram‐negative bacteria, with or without antibiotic resistance, AB1 was evaluated for antiviral activity and AF was assessed for activity against different Candida strains.



Inxed for NIH by Dragonfly Kingdom Library https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5552930/

In vitro anti-inflammatory and skin protective properties of Virgin coconut oil

Posted on November 9, 2019 at 10:00 AM Comments comments (0)

Virgin coconut oil (VCO) has been traditionally used as moisturizer since centuries by people in the tropical region. Clinical studies have revealed that VCO improves the symptoms of skin disorders by moisturizing and soothing the skin. However, the mechanistic action of VCO and its benefits on skin has not been elucidated in vitro. The cytotoxicity (CTC50) of VCO was 706.53 ± 2.1 and 787.15 ± 1.1 μg/mL in THP-1 (Human monocytes) and HaCaT (Human keratinocytes) cells respectively. VCO inhibited TNF-α (62.34 ± 3.2 %), IFN-γ (42.66 ± 2.9 %), IL-6 (52.07 ± 2.0 %), IL-8 (53.98 ± 1.8 %) and IL-5 (51.57 ± 2.6 %) respectively in THP-1 cells. Involucrin (INV) and filaggrin (FLG) content increased by 47.53 ± 2.1 % and 40.45 ± 1.2 % respectively in HaCaT cells. VCO increased the expression of Aquaporin-3 (AQP3), involucrin (INV) and filaggrin (FLG) and showed moderate UV protection in HaCaT cells. In vitro skin irritation studies in Reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) and NIH3T3 cells showed that VCO is a non skin irritant (IC50 > 1000 μg/mL) and non phototoxic (PIF < 2). Our study demonstrated the anti inflammatory activity of VCO by suppressing inflammatory markers and protecting the skin by enhancing skin barrier function. This is the first report on anti-inflammatory and skin protective benefits of VCO in vitro. Overall, the results warrant the use of VCO in skin care formulations..... https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2225411017300871

Queries: Biology Beauty and Spirituality

Posted on May 27, 2016 at 10:35 AM Comments comments (0)

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Sjogren's Syndrome - Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment

 

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Gnosis: Moringa and the Tree of Life

Posted on March 25, 2016 at 4:35 AM Comments comments (1)

Moringa Tree | Trees for Life

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Intro to Moringa These tiny leaves could save millions of lives. Moringa Diagram: Tiny leaves. Enourmous benefits. Source: Nutritive Value of Indian Foods, by C.

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FOOD, ENVIRONMENT AND HAIR - THE NIH

Posted on December 28, 2015 at 10:45 AM Comments comments (0)

Comparative Hair Restorer Efficacy of Medicinal Herb on Nude (Foxn1nu) Mice

Shahnaz Begum, Mi Ra Lee, Li Juan Gu, Md. Jamil Hossain, Hyun Kyoung Kim, Chang Keun Sung

Biomed Res Int. 2014; 2014: 319795. Published online 2014 November 13. doi: 10.1155/2014/319795

PMCID: PMC4247959

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Hair as a Biomarker of Environmental Manganese Exposure

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Environ Sci Technol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 February 5.

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Hair restoration surgery: challenges and solutions

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Correlates of Cortisol in Human Hair: Implications for Epidemiologic Studies on Health Effects of Chronic Stress

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Hair as a Meaningful Measure of Baseline Cortisol Levels over Time in Dogs

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Strong Relationship between Oral Dose and Tenofovir Hair Levels in a Randomized Trial: Hair as a Potential Adherence Measure for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

Albert Y. Liu, Qiyun Yang, Yong Huang, Peter Bacchetti, Peter L. Anderson, Chengshi Jin, Kathy Goggin, Kristefer Stojanovski, Robert Grant, Susan P. Buchbinder, Ruth M. Greenblatt, Monica Gandhi

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Biomonitoring the Cooked Meat Carcinogen 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in Hair: Impact of Exposure, Pigmentation and Cytochrome P450 1A2 Phenotype

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Post-transcriptional Regulation of Keratinocyte Progenitor Cell Expansion, Differentiation and Hair Follicle Regression by miR-22

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A Clinical Trial to Investigate the Effect of Cynatine HNS on Hair and Nail Parameters

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Prostaglandin D2 Inhibits Hair Growth and Is Elevated in Bald Scalp of Men with Androgenetic Alopecia

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Measuring environmental stress in East Greenland polar bears, 1892–1927 and 1988–2009: what does hair cortisol tell us?

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Treatment of MSCs with Wnt1a-conditioned medium activates DP cells and promotes hair follicle regrowth

Liang Dong, Haojie Hao, Lei Xia, Jiejie Liu, Dongdong Ti, Chuan Tong, Qian Hou, Qingwang Han, Yali Zhao, Huiling Liu, Xiaobing Fu, Weidong Han

Sci Rep. 2014; 4: 5432. Published online 2014 June 25. doi: 10.1038/srep05432

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Relationship Between Nutritional Habits and Hair Calcium Levels in Young Women

Marta Jeruszka-Bielak, Anna Brzozowska

Biol Trace Elem Res. 2011 December; 144(1-3): 63–76. Published online 2011 March 30. doi: 10.1007/s12011-011-9030-0

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Dietary Heterogeneity among Western Industrialized Countries Reflected in the Stable Isotope Ratios of Human Hair

Luciano O. Valenzuela, Lesley A. Chesson, Gabriel J. Bowen, Thure E. Cerling, James R. Ehleringer

PLoS One. 2012; 7(3): e34234. Published online 2012 March 30. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0034234

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Species Identification Key of Korean Mammal Hair

Eunok LEE, Tae-Young CHOI, Donggul WOO, Mi-Sook MIN, Shoei SUGITA, Hang LEE

J Vet Med Sci. 2014 May; 76(5): 667–675. Published online 2014 January 23. doi: 10.1292/jvms.13-0569

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Exploring the contribution and significance of animal protein in the diet of bonobos by stable isotope ratio analysis of hair

Vicky M. Oelze, Benjamin T. Fuller, Michael P. Richards, Barbara Fruth, Martin Surbeck, Jean-Jacques Hublin, Gottfried Hohmann

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 June 14; 108(24): 9792–9797. Published online 2011 May 31. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1018502108

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Wnt7b is an important intrinsic regulator of hair follicle stem cell homeostasis and hair follicle cycling

Eve Kandyba, Krzysztof Kobielak

Stem Cells. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 April 15.

Published in final edited form as: Stem Cells. 2014 April; 32(4): 886–901. doi: 10.1002/stem.1599

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Hair growth-promoting activity of hot water extract of Thuja orientalis

Nan-nan Zhang, Dong Ki Park, Hye-Jin Park

BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013; 13: 9. Published online 2013 January 10. doi: 10.1186/1472-6882-13-9

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Estrogen Leads to Reversible Hair Cycle Retardation through Inducing Premature Catagen and Maintaining Telogen

Hui-min Hu, Shou-bing Zhang, Xiao-hua Lei, Zhi-li Deng, Wei-xiang Guo, Zhi-fang Qiu, Shuang Liu, Xin-yue Wang, He Zhang, En-kui Duan

PLoS One. 2012; 7(7): e40124. Published online 2012 July 5. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0040124

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Concerns Regarding Hair Cortisol as a Biomarker of Chronic Stress in Exercise and Sport Science

Markus Gerber, Serge Brand, Magnus Lindwall, Catherine Elliot, Nadeem Kalak, Christian Herrmann, Uwe Pühse, Ingibjörg H. Jonsdottir

J Sports Sci Med. 2012 December; 11(4): 571–581. Published online 2012 December 1.

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Advantages of the Use of Deciduous Teeth, Hair, and Blood Analysis for Lead and Cadmium Bio-Monitoring in Children. A Study of 6-Year-Old Children from Krakow (Poland)

Henryk J. Barton

Biol Trace Elem Res. 2011 November; 143(2): 637–658. Published online 2010 November 18. doi: 10.1007/s12011-010-8896-6

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The Efficacy and Safety of 17α-Estradiol (Ell-Cranell® alpha 0.025%) Solution on Female Pattern Hair Loss: Single Center, Open-Label, Non-Comparative, Phase IV Study

Jae-Hong Kim, Sung Yul Lee, Hae-Jin Lee, Na-Young Yoon, Won-Soo Lee

Ann Dermatol. 2012 August; 24(3): 295–305. Published online 2012 July 25. doi: 10.5021/ad.2012.24.3.295

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Determination of exposure to lead of subjects from southwestern Poland by human hair analysis

Izabela Michalak, Paulina Wołowiec, Katarzyna Chojnacka

Environ Monit Assess. 2014; 186(4): 2259–2267. Published online 2013 December 18. doi: 10.1007/s10661-013-3534-3

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Tooth, hair and claw: comparing epithelial stem cell niches of ectodermal appendages

Adrien Naveau, Kerstin Seidel, Ophir D. Klein

Exp Cell Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 July 15.

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Differentiating Inbred Mouse Strains from Each Other and Those with Single Gene Mutations Using Hair Proteomics

Robert H. Rice, Katie M. Bradshaw, Blythe P. Durbin-Johnson, David M. Rocke, Richard A. Eigenheer, Brett S. Phinney, John P. Sundberg

PLoS One. 2012; 7(12): e51956. Published online 2012 December 14. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0051956

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Alopecia: Possible Causes and Treatments, Particularly in Captive Nonhuman Primates

Melinda A Novak, Jerrold S Meyer

Comp Med. 2009 February; 59(1): 18–26. Published online 2009 February.

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Blood and Hair Manganese Concentrations in Pregnant Women from the Infants’ Environmental Health Study (ISA) in Costa Rica

Ana M. Mora, Berna van Wendel de Joode, Donna Mergler, Leonel Córdoba, Camilo Cano, Rosario Quesada, Donald R. Smith, José A. Menezes-Filho, Thomas Lundh, Christian H. Lindh, Asa Bradman, Brenda Eskenazi

Environ Sci Technol. 2014 March 18; 48(6): 3467–3476. Published online 2014 March 6. doi: 10.1021/es404279r

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Bacterial Deposition of Gold on Hair: Archeological, Forensic and Toxicological Implications

Genevieve Phillips, Frank Reith, Clifford Qualls, Abdul-Mehdi Ali, Mike Spilde, Otto Appenzeller

PLoS One. 2010; 5(2): e9335. Published online 2010 February 19. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009335

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Selective Deletion of Cochlear Hair Cells Causes Rapid Age-Dependent Changes in Spiral Ganglion and Cochlear Nucleus Neurons

Ling Tong, Melissa K. Strong, Tejbeer Kaur, Jose M. Juiz, Elizabeth C. Oesterle, Clifford Hume, Mark E. Warchol, Richard D. Palmiter, Edwin W Rubel

J Neurosci. 2015 May 20; 35(20): 7878–7891. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2179-14.2015

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Effects of adrenocorticotropic hormone challenge and age on hair cortisol concentrations in dairy cattle

Marcela del Rosario González-de-la-Vara, Ricardo Arturo Valdez, Vicente Lemus-Ramirez, Juan Carlos Vázquez-Chagoyán, Alejandro Villa-Godoy, Marta C. Romano

Can J Vet Res. 2011 July; 75(3): 216–221.

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Chronic Restraint Stress Inhibits Hair Growth via Substance P Mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species in Mice

Nan Liu, Lin-Hui Wang, Ling-Ling Guo, Guo-Qing Wang, Xi-Ping Zhou, Yan Jiang, Jing Shang, Koji Murao, Jing-Wei Chen, Wen-Qing Fu, Guo-Xing Zhang

PLoS One. 2013; 8(4): e61574. Published online 2013 April 26. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0061574

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Identification of Modulators of Hair Cell Regeneratin in the Zebrafish Lateral Line

Parhum Namdaran, Katherine E. Reinhart, Kelly N. Owens, David W. Raible, Edwin W Rubel

J Neurosci. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2012 September 7.

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Microfluidic Isolation of CD34-Positive Skin Cells Enables Regeneration of Hair and Sebaceous Glands In Vivo

Beili Zhu, Yaakov Nahmias, Martin L. Yarmush, Shashi K. Murthy

Stem Cells Transl Med. 2014 November; 3(11): 1354–1362. Published online 2014 September 9. doi: 10.5966/sctm.2014-0098

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A Model of Filiform Hair Distribution on the Cricket Cercus

Jeffrey J. Heys, Prathish K. Rajaraman, Tomas Gedeon, John P. Miller

PLoS One. 2012; 7(10): e46588. Published online 2012 October 4. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0046588

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FGF5 is a crucial regulator of hair length in humans

Claire A. Higgins, Lynn Petukhova, Sivan Harel, Yuan Y. Ho, Esther Drill, Lawrence Shapiro, Muhammad Wajid, Angela M. Christiano

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 July 22; 111(29): 10648–10653. Published online 2014 July 2. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1402862111

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Hair cortisol levels as a retrospective marker of hypothalamic-pituitary axis activity throughout pregnancy: Comparison to salivary cortisol

Kimberly L. D’Anna-Hernandez, Randal G. Ross, Crystal L. Natvig, Mark L. Laudenslager

Physiol Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2012 August 3.

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Alopecia in a Viable Phospholipase C Delta 1 and Phospholipase C Delta 3 Double Mutant

Fabian Runkel, Maik Hintze, Sebastian Griesing, Marion Michels, Birgit Blanck, Kiyoko Fukami, Jean-Louis Guénet, Thomas Franz

PLoS One. 2012; 7(6): e39203. Published online 2012 June 19. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0039203

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Comparing the Novel Method of Assessing PrEP Adherence/Exposure Using Hair Samples to Other Pharmacologic and Traditional Measures

Sanjiv M. Baxi, Albert Liu, Peter Bacchetti, Gaudensia Mutua, Eduard J. Sanders, Freddie M. Kibengo, Jessica E. Haberer, James Rooney, Craig W. Hendrix, Peter L. Anderson, Yong Huang, Frances Priddy, Monica Gandhi

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2015 January 1; 68(1): 13–20. Published online 2014 December 11. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000386

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A review of adipocyte lineage cells and dermal papilla cells in hair follicle regeneration

Peipei Zhang, Russell E Kling, Sudheer K Ravuri, Lauren E Kokai, J Peter Rubin, Jia-ke Chai, Kacey G Marra

J Tissue Eng. 2014; 5: 2041731414556850. Published online 2014 October 27. doi: 10.1177/2041731414556850

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Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling promotes hair growth

Sivan Harel, Claire A. Higgins, Jane E. Cerise, Zhenpeng Dai, James C. Chen, Raphael Clynes, Angela M. Christiano

Sci Adv. 2015 October; 1(9): e1500973. Published online 2015 October 23. doi: 10.1126/sciadv.1500973

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Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after Targeted Ablation of Hair Cells with Diphtheria Toxin

Justin S. Golub, Ling Tong, Tot B. Ngyuen, Cliff R. Hume, Richard D. Palmiter, Edwin W. Rubel, Jennifer S. Stone

J Neurosci. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 April 24.

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Utility and Cutoff Value of Hair Nicotine as a Biomarker of Long-Term Tobacco Smoke Exposure, Compared to Salivary Cotinine

Sungroul Kim, Benjamin J. Apelberg, Erika Avila-Tang, Lisa Hepp, Dongmin Yun, Jonathan M. Samet, Patrick N. Breysse

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 August; 11(8): 8368–8382. Published online 2014 August 15. doi: 10.3390/ijerph110808368

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Metal Ions Released from Fixed Orthodontic Appliance Affect Hair Mineral Content

Marcin Mikulewicz, Paulina Wołowiec, Bartłomiej Loster, Katarzyna Chojnacka

Biol Trace Elem Res. 2015; 163: 11–18. Published online 2014 October 19. doi: 10.1007/s12011-014-0152-z

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Trophic Discrimination Factors of Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes in Hair of Corn Fed Wild Boar

Michaela Holá, Miloš Ježek, Tomáš Kušta, Michaela Košatová

PLoS One. 2015; 10(4): e0125042. Published online 2015 April 27. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0125042

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Biomonitoring of Carcinogenic Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines in Hair: A Validation Study

Erin E. Bessette, Isil Yasa, Deborah Dunbar, Lynne R. Wilkens, Loic Le Marchand, Robert J. Turesky

Chem Res Toxicol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2010 August 17.

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Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in human hair are related to geography

James R. Ehleringer, Gabriel J. Bowen, Lesley A. Chesson, Adam G. West, David W. Podlesak, Thure E. Cerling

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 February 26; 105(8): 2788–2793. Published online 2008 February 25. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0712228105

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Detectability of testosterone esters and estradiol benzoate in bovine hair and plasma following pour-on treatment

A. A. M. Stolker, M. J. Groot, J. J. P. Lasaroms, A. W. J. M. Nijrolder, M. H. Blokland, I. Riedmaier, C. Becker, H. H. D. Meyer, M. W. F. Nielen

Anal Bioanal Chem. 2009 October; 395(4): 1075–1087. Published online 2009 August 26. doi: 10.1007/s00216-009-3037-9

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Hair mercury levels in Amazonian populations: spatial distribution and trends

Flavia L Barbieri, Jacques Gardon

Int J Health Geogr. 2009; 8: 71. Published online 2009 December 21. doi: 10.1186/1476-072X-8-71

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HGF/SF Increases Number of Skin Melanocytes but Does Not Alter Quality or Quantity of Follicular Melanogenesis

Agnieszka Wolnicka-Glubisz, Anna Pecio, Dagmara Podkowa, Przemyslaw Mieszko Plonka, Maja Grabacka

PLoS One. 2013; 8(11): e74883. Published online 2013 November 6. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0074883

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Relationships among Mercury Concentration, and Stable Isotope Ratios of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Scalp Hair of Residents from Seven Countries: Effects of Marine Fish and C4 Plants Consumption

Tetsuya Endo, Moriaki Hayasaka, Hideki Ogasawra, Osamu Kimura, Yuichi Kotaki, Koichi Haraguchi

PLoS One. 2015; 10(6): e0128149. Published online 2015 June 12. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0128149

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Chronologically matched toenail-Hg to hair-Hg ratio: temporal analysis within the Japanese community (U.S.)

Thomas Hinners, Ami Tsuchiya, Alan H Stern, Thomas M Burbacher, Elaine M Faustman, Koenraad Mariën

Environ Health. 2012; 11: 81. Published online 2012 October 31. doi: 10.1186/1476-069X-11-81

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Extract of Allium tuberosum Rottler ex Spreng Promoted the Hair Growth through Regulating the Expression of IGF-1

Ki Moon Park, Dong Woo Kim, Seung Ho Lee

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015; 2015: 413538. Published online 2015 May 20. doi: 10.1155/2015/413538

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Platycarya strobilacea S. et Z. Extract Has a High Antioxidant Capacity and Exhibits Hair Growth-promoting Effects in Male C57BL/6 Mice

Eun Jin Kim, Joo Yeon Choi, Byung Cheol Park, Bog-Hieu Lee

Prev Nutr Food Sci. 2014 September; 19(3): 136–144. doi: 10.3746/pnf.2014.19.3.136

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Exploration of Nutraceutical Potential of Herbal Oil Formulated from Parasitic Plant

Fozia Anjum, Shazia Anwer Bukhari, Muhammad Shahid, Tanveer Hussain Bokhari, Mir Munsif Ali Talpur

Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. 2014; 11(1): 78–86. Published online 2013 November 2.

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Topical Application of Oleuropein Induces Anagen Hair Growth in Telogen Mouse Skin

Tao Tong, Nahyun Kim, Taesun Park

PLoS One. 2015; 10(6): e0129578. Published online 2015 June 10. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0129578

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Is There a True Concern Regarding the Use of Hair Dye and Malignancy Development?: A Review of the Epidemiological Evidence Relating Personal Hair Dye Use to the Risk of Malignancy

Peter Saitta, Christopher E. Cook, Jane L. Messina, Ronald Brancaccio, Benedict C. Wu, Steven K. Grekin, Jean Holland

J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2013 January; 6(1): 39–46.

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Scalp Micropigmentation: A Concealer for Hair and Scalp Deformities

William R. Rassman, Jae P. Pak, Jino Kim, Norman F. Estrin

J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2015 March; 8(3): 35–42.

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Hair for brain trade-off, a metabolic bypass for encephalization

Yosef Dror, Michael Hopp

Springerplus. 2014; 3: 562. Published online 2014 September 27. doi: 10.1186/2193-1801-3-562

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Hair Mercury Concentrations and Fish Consumption Patterns in Florida Residents

Adam M. Schaefer, Emily L. Jensen, Gregory D. Bossart, John S. Reif

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 July; 11(7): 6709–6726. Published online 2014 June 26. doi: 10.3390/ijerph110706709

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Assessing Sources of Human Methylmercury Exposure Using Stable Mercury Isotopes

Miling Li, Laura S. Sherman, Joel D. Blum, Philippe Grandjean, Bjarni Mikkelsen, Pál Weihe, Elsie M. Sunderland, James P. Shine

Environ Sci Technol. 2014 August 5; 48(15): 8800–8806. Published online 2014 June 26. doi: 10.1021/es500340r

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Uncovering Genes and Ploidy Involved in the High Diversity in Root Hair Density, Length and Response to Local Scarce Phosphate in Arabidopsis thaliana

Markus G. Stetter, Karl Schmid, Uwe Ludewig

PLoS One. 2015; 10(3): e0120604. Published online 2015 March 17. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0120604

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Aqueous Extract of Red Deer Antler Promotes Hair Growth by Regulating the Hair Cycle and Cell Proliferation in Hair Follicles

Jing-jie Li, Zheng Li, Li-juan Gu, Yun-bo Wang, Mi-ra Lee, Chang-keun Sung

ScientificWorldJournal. 2014; 2014: 878162. Published online 2014 February 13. doi: 10.1155/2014/878162

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The Changing Selenium Nutritional Status of Chinese Residents

Sumei Li, Gary S. Bañuelos, Longhua Wu, Weiming Shi

Nutrients. 2014 March; 6(3): 1103–1114. Published online 2014 March 14. doi: 10.3390/nu6031103

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The Promoting Effect of Ishige sinicola on Hair Growth

Jung-Il Kang, Eun-JI Kim, Min-Kyoung Kim, You-Jin Jeon, Sung-Myung Kang, Young-Sang Koh, Eun-Sook Yoo, Hee-Kyoung Kang

Mar Drugs. 2013 June; 11(6): 1783–1799. Published online 2013 May 24. doi: 10.3390/md11061783

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Basal cell carcinomas in mice arise from hair follicle stem cells and multiple epithelial progenitor populations

Marina Grachtchouk, Joanna Pero, Steven H. Yang, Alexandre N. Ermilov, L. Evan Michael, Aiqin Wang, Dawn Wilbert, Rajiv M. Patel, Jennifer Ferris, James Diener, Mary Allen, Seokchun Lim, Li-Jyun Syu, Monique Verhaegen, Andrzej A. Dlugosz

J Clin Invest. 2011 May 2; 121(5): 1768–1781. Published online 2011 April 25. doi: 10.1172/JCI46307

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The prostamide-related glaucoma therapy, bimatoprost, offers a novel approach for treating scalp alopecias

Karzan G. Khidhir, David F. Woodward, Nilofer P. Farjo, Bessam K. Farjo, Elaine S. Tang, Jenny W. Wang, Steven M. Picksley, Valerie A. Randall

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Sterol Intermediates of Cholesterol Biosynthesis Inhibit Hair Growth and Trigger an Innate Immune Response in Cicatricial Alopecia

Sreejith P. Panicker, Taneeta Ganguly, Mary Consolo, Vera Price, Paradi Mirmirani, Kord Honda, Pratima Karnik

PLoS One. 2012; 7(6): e38449. Published online 2012 June 7. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0038449

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A Comparison of Levels of Select Minerals in Scalp Hair Samples with Estimated Dietary Intakes of These Minerals in Women of Reproductive Age

J. Suliburska

Biol Trace Elem Res. 2011 December; 144(1-3): 77–85. Published online 2011 March 29. doi: 10.1007/s12011-011-9034-9

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Effectiveness of the combinational treatment of Laminaria japonica and Cistanche tubulosa extracts in hair growth

Kyungha Shin, Tae-Su Kim, Jangbeen Kyung, Dajeong Kim, Dongsun Park, Ehn-Kyoung Choi, Sung-Pyo Lee, Woong-Suk Yang, Myung-Hwa Kang, Yun-Bae Kim

Lab Anim Res. 2015 March; 31(1): 24–32. Published online 2015 March 20. doi: 10.5625/lar.2015.31.1.24

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Hair Loss and Hypothalamic–Pituitary–Adrenocortical Axis Activity in Captive Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

Melinda A Novak, Amanda F Hamel, Kris Coleman, Corrine K Lutz, Julie Worlein, Mark Menard, Amy Ryan, Kendra Rosenberg, Jerrold S Meyer

J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci. 2014 May; 53(3): 261–266. Published online 2014 May.

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Hair Loss and Hair-Pulling in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

Corrine K Lutz, Kristine Coleman, Julie Worlein, Melinda A Novak

J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci. 2013 July; 52(4): 454–457. Published online 2013 July.

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Stable Isotope Models of Sugar Intake Using Hair, Red Blood Cells, and Plasma, but Not Fasting Plasma Glucose, Predict Sugar Intake in a Yup’ik Study Population

Sarah H. Nash, Alan R. Kristal, Scarlett E. Hopkins, Bert B. Boyer, Diane M. O’Brien

J Nutr. 2014 January; 144(1): 75–80. Published online 2013 November 6. doi: 10.3945/jn.113.182113

PMCID: PMC3861795

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Hair cell damage recruited Lgr5-expressing cells are hair cell progenitors in neonatal mouse utricle

Jinchao Lin, Xiaodong Zhang, Fengfang Wu, Weinian Lin

Front Cell Neurosci. 2015; 9: 113. Published online 2015 April 1. doi: 10.3389/fncel.2015.00113

PMCID: PMC4381628

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74.

Relation between stable isotope ratios in human red blood cells and hair: implications for using the nitrogen isotope ratio of hair as a biomarker of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid

Sarah H Nash, Alan R Kristal, Bert B Boyer, Irena B King, Jordan S Metzgar, Diane M O'Brien

Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 December; 90(6): 1642–1647. Published online 2009 October 28. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28482

PMCID: PMC2777473

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Population density-dependent hair cortisol concentrations in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

A.M. Dettmer, M.A. Novak, J.S. Meyer, S.J. Suomi

Psychoneuroendocrinology. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 April 1.

Published in final edited form as: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2014 April; 42: 59–67. Published online 2014 January 9. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2014.01.002

PMCID: PMC3959662

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76.

Antiretroviral concentrations in small hair samples as a feasible marker of adherence in rural Kenya

Matthew D Hickey, Charles R Salmen, Robert A Tessler, Dan Omollo, Peter Bacchetti, Richard Magerenge, Brian Mattah, Marcus R Salmen, Daniel Zoughbie, Kathryn J Fiorella, Elvin Geng, Betty Njoroge, Chengshi Jin, Yong Huang, Elizabeth A Bukusi, Craig R Cohen, Monica Gandhi

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 July 1.

Published in final edited form as: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2014 July 1; 66(3): 311–315. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000154

Correction in: volume 69 on page e42

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Smad4-dependent desmoglein-4 expression contributes to hair follicle integrity

Philip Owens, Hisham Bazzi, Erin Engelking, Gangwen Han, Angela M. Christiano, Xiao-Jing Wang

Dev Biol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2009 October 1.

Published in final edited form as: Dev Biol. 2008 October 1; 322(1): 156–166. Published online 2008 July 26. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2008.07.020

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Utilization of Sugarcane Habitat by Feral Pig (Sus scrofa) in Northern Tropical Queensland: Evidence from the Stable Isotope Composition of Hair

Christopher M. Wurster, Jack Robertson, David A. Westcott, Bart Dryden, Antoine Zazzo, Michael I. Bird

PLoS One. 2012; 7(9): e43538. Published online 2012 September 5. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0043538

PMCID: PMC3434169

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79.

Hair and Plasma Data Show that Lopinavir, Ritonavir and Efavirenz All Transfer from Mother to Infant in Utero, but only Efavirenz Transfers via Breastfeeding

Monica Gandhi, Julia Mwesigwa, Francesca Aweeka, Albert Plenty, Edwin Charlebois, Theodore D. Ruel, Yong Huang, Tamara Clark, Veronica Ades, Paul Natureeba, Flavia A. Luwedde, Jane Achan, Moses R. Kamya, Diane V. Havlir, Deborah Cohan, the Prevention of Malaria and HIV disease in Tororo (PROMOTE) study

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 August 15.

Published in final edited form as: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2013 August 15; 63(5): 578–584. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e31829c48ad

PMCID: PMC3800282

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80.

Hair Mercury Levels in U.S. Children and Women of Childbearing Age: Reference Range Data from NHANES 1999–2000

Margaret A. McDowell, Charles F. Dillon, John Osterloh, P. Michael Bolger, Edo Pellizzari, Reshan Fernando, Ruben Montes de Oca, Susan E. Schober, Thomas Sinks, Robert L. Jones, Kathryn R. Mahaffey

Environ Health Perspect. 2004 August; 112(11): 1165–1171. Published online 2004 May 27. doi: 10.1289/ehp.7046

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Inhibition of notch activity promotes non-mitotic regeneration of hair cells in the adult mouse utricles

Vincent Lin, Justin S. Golub, Tot Bui Nguyen, Clifford R. Hume, Elizabeth C. Oesterle, Jennifer S. Stone

J Neurosci. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2012 April 26.

Published in final edited form as: J Neurosci. 2011 October 26; 31(43): 15329–15339. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2057-11.2011

Correction in: J Neurosci. 2012 January; 32(4): 1513.

PMCID: PMC3235543

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Impaired Hair Growth and Wound Healing in Mice Lacking Thyroid Hormone Receptors

Constanza Contreras-Jurado, Laura García-Serrano, Mónica Martínez-Fernández, Lidia Ruiz-Llorente, Jesus M. Paramio, Ana Aranda

PLoS One. 2014; 9(9): e108137. Published online 2014 September 25. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0108137

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Toxicokinetics of mercury in blood compartments and hair of fish-fed sled dogs

Camilla L Lieske, Sara K Moses, Judith M Castellini, Jessica Klejka, Karsten Hueffer, Todd M O'Hara

Acta Vet Scand. 2011; 53(1): 66. Published online 2011 December 7. doi: 10.1186/1751-0147-53-66

PMCID: PMC3264498

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A conceptual model of root hair ideotypes for future agricultural environments: what combination of traits should be targeted to cope with limited P availability?

L. K. Brown, T. S. George, L. X. Dupuy, P. J. White

Ann Bot. 2013 July; 112(2): 317–330. Published online 2012 November 20. doi: 10.1093/aob/mcs231

PMCID: PMC3698376

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85.

Calcineurin/Nfatc1 signaling links skin stem cell quiescence to hormonal signaling during pregnancy and lactation

Jill Goldstein, Sean Fletcher, Eve Roth, Christine Wu, Andrew Chun, Valerie Horsley

Genes Dev. 2014 May 1; 28(9): 983–994. doi: 10.1101/gad.236554.113

Correction in: Genes Dev. 2014 July 1; 28(13): 1515.

PMCID: PMC4018496

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86.

Association between hair mineral and age, BMI and nutrient intakes among Korean female adults

Se Ra Hong, Seung Min Lee, Na Ri Lim, Hwan Wook Chung, Hong Seok Ahn

Nutr Res Pract. 2009 Autumn; 3(3): 212–219. Published online 2009 September 30. doi: 10.4162/nrp.2009.3.3.212

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Hair Growth Promoting Potential of Phospholipids Purified from Porcine Lung Tissues

Seong-Hyun Choi, Jeong-Su Moon, Byung-Suk Jeon, Yeon-Jeong Jeon, Byung-Il Yoon, Chang-Jin Lim

Biomol Ther (Seoul) 2015 March; 23(2): 174–179. Published online 2015 March 1. doi: 10.4062/biomolther.2014.108

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Physiological regeneration of skin appendages and implications for regenerative medicine

Cheng-Ming Chuong, Valerie A Randall, Randall B. Widelitz, Ping Wu, Ting-Xin Jiang

Physiology (Bethesda) Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 April 8.

Published in final edited form as: Physiology (Bethesda). 2012 April; 27(2): 61–72. doi: 10.1152/physiol.00028.2011

PMCID: PMC3620028

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89.

Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in Body Water and Hair: Modeling Isotope Dynamics in Nonhuman Primates

Shannon P. O’Grady, Luciano O. Valenzuela, Christopher H. Remien, Lindsey E. Enright, Matthew J. Jorgensen, Jay R. Kaplan, Janice D. Wagner, Thure E. Cerling, James R. Ehleringer

Am J Primatol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 July 1.

Published in final edited form as: Am J Primatol. 2012 July; 74(7): 651–660. Published online 2012 May 2. doi: 10.1002/ajp.22019

PMCID: PMC3365632

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90.

A Simple Method to Extract DNA from Hair Shafts Using Enzymatic Laundry Powder

Zheng Guan, Yu Zhou, Jinchuan Liu, Xiaoling Jiang, Sicong Li, Shuming Yang, Ailiang Chen

PLoS One. 2013; 8(7): e69588. Published online 2013 July 29. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0069588

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Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths' Hairs

Mike Spilde, Antonio Lanzirotti, Clifford Qualls, Genevieve Phillips, Abdul-Mehdi Ali, Larry Agenbroad, Otto Appenzeller

PLoS One. 2011; 6(6): e21705. Published online 2011 June 29. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021705

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Probiotic Bacteria Induce a ‘Glow of Health’

Tatiana Levkovich, Theofilos Poutahidis, Christopher Smillie, Bernard J. Varian, Yassin M. Ibrahim, Jessica R. Lakritz, Eric J. Alm, Susan E. Erdman

PLoS One. 2013; 8(1): e53867. Published online 2013 January 16. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0053867

PMCID: PMC3547054

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93.

Tracking Cats: Problems with Placing Feline Carnivores on δ18O, δD Isoscapes

Stephanie J. Pietsch, Keith A. Hobson, Leonard I. Wassenaar, Thomas Tütken

PLoS One. 2011; 6(9): e24601. Published online 2011 September 9. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0024601

PMCID: PMC3170367

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Hair interior defect in AKR/J mice

K. A. Giehl, C. S. Potter, B. Wu, K. A. Silva, L. B. Rowe, A. Awgulewitsch, J. P. Sundberg

Clin Exp Dermatol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2010 June 1.

Published in final edited form as: Clin Exp Dermatol. 2009 June; 34(4): 509–517. Published online 2009 April 14. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2230.2008.03135.x

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95.

Pharmacokinetics of lopinavir/ritonavir and efavirenz in food insecure HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women in Tororo, Uganda

Imke H. Bartelink, Rada M. Savic, Julia Mwesigwa, Jane Achan, Tamara Clark, Albert Plenty, Edwin Charlebois, Moses Kamya, Sera L. Young, Monica Gandhi, Diane Havlir, Deborah Cohan, Francesca Aweeka

J Clin Pharmacol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 February 1.

Published in final edited form as: J Clin Pharmacol. 2014 February; 54(2): 121–132. Published online 2013 September 21. doi: 10.1002/jcph.167

PMCID: PMC3933454

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Characteristics of Androgenetic Alopecia in Asian

Won-Soo Lee, Hae-Jin Lee

Ann Dermatol. 2012 August; 24(3): 243–252. Published online 2012 July 25. doi: 10.5021/ad.2012.24.3.243

PMCID: PMC3412231

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97.

High Runx1 levels promote a reversible more differentiated cell-state in hair follicle stem cells during quiescence

Song Eun Lee, Aiko Sada, Meng Zhang, David J. McDermitt, Shu Yang Lu, Kenneth J. Kemphues, Tudorita Tumbar

Cell Rep. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 February 13.

Published in final edited form as: Cell Rep. 2014 February 13; 6(3): 499–513. Published online 2014 January 23. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2013.12.039

Correction in: volume 6 on page 592

PMCID: PMC4052453

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98.

Hair Growth Promotion Activity and Its Mechanism of Polygonum multiflorum

Yunfei Li, Mingnuan Han, Pei Lin, Yanran He, Jie Yu, Ronghua Zhao

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015; 2015: 517901. Published online 2015 July 30. doi: 10.1155/2015/517901

PMCID: PMC4534627

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99.

Elevated Contaminants Contrasted with Potential Benefits of ω-3 Fatty Acids in Wild Food Consumers of Two Remote First Nations Communities in Northern Ontario, Canada

Timothy A. Seabert, Shinjini Pal, Bernard M. Pinet, Francois Haman, Michael A. Robidoux, Pascal Imbeault, Eva M. Krümmel, Linda E. Kimpe, Jules M. Blais

PLoS One. 2014; 9(3): e90351. Published online 2014 March 5. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090351

PMCID: PMC3943865

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100.

Screening of Trace Elements in Hair of the Female Population with Different Types of Cancers in Wielkopolska Region of Poland

Bogusław Czerny, Krzysztof Krupka, Marcin Ożarowski, Agnieszka Seremak-Mrozikiewicz

ScientificWorldJournal. 2014; 2014: 953181. Published online 2014 December 15. doi: 10.1155/2014/953181

PMCID: PMC4279272

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HEADLINES: HAIR LOSS - THE NIH

Posted on December 28, 2015 at 10:40 AM Comments comments (0)

 

1.

 

To grow or not to grow: Hair morphogenesis and human genetic hair disorders

 

Olivier Duverger, Maria I. Morasso

 

Semin Cell Dev Biol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 January 1.

 

Published in final edited form as: Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2014 Jan-Feb; 0: 22–33. Published online 2013 December 17. doi: 10.1016/j.semcdb.2013.12.006

 

PMCID: PMC3988237

 

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2.

 

A PAIR OF TRANSMEMBRANE RECEPTORS ESSENTIAL FOR THE RETENTION AND PIGMENTATION OF HAIR

 

Rong Han, Hideyuki Beppu, Yun-Kyoung Lee, Katia Georgopoulos, Lionel Larue, En Li, Lorin Weiner, Janice L. Brissette

 

Genesis. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 November 1.

 

Published in final edited form as: Genesis. 2012 November; 50(11): 783–800. Published online 2012 June 19. doi: 10.1002/dvg.22039

 

PMCID: PMC3461250

 

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3.

 

Modulating hair follicle size with Wnt10b-DKK1 pair during hair regeneration

 

Mingxing Lei, Haiying Guo, Weiming Qiu, Xiangdong Lai, Tian Yang, Randall B. Widelitz, Cheng-Ming Chuong, Xiaohua Lian, Li Yang

 

Exp Dermatol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 June 1.

 

Published in final edited form as: Exp Dermatol. 2014 June; 23(6): 407–413. doi: 10.1111/exd.12416

 

PMCID: PMC4383245

 

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Therapeutic strategy for hair regeneration: Hair cycle activation, niche environment modulation, wound-induced follicle neogenesis and stem cell engineering

 

Shan-Chang Chueh, Sung-Jan Lin, Chih-Chiang Chen, Mingxing Lei, Ling Mei Wang, Randall B. Widelitz, Michael W. Hughes, Ting-Xing Jiang, Cheng Ming Chuong

 

Expert Opin Biol Ther. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 March 1.

 

Published in final edited form as: Expert Opin Biol Ther. 2013 March; 13(3): 377–391. Published online 2013 January 5. doi: 10.1517/14712598.2013.739601

 

PMCID: PMC3706200

 

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5.

 

The structure and organization of lanceolate mechanosensory complexes at mouse hair follicles

 

Lishi Li, David D Ginty

 

eLife. 2014; 3: e01901. Published online 2014 February 25. doi: 10.7554/eLife.01901

 

Includes additional comments & authors

 

PMCID: PMC3930909

 

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6.

 

Minireview: Hair Cortisol: A Novel Biomarker of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Activity

 

Jerrold S. Meyer, Melinda A. Novak

 

Endocrinology. 2012 September; 153(9): 4120–4127. Published online 2012 July 9. doi: 10.1210/en.2012-1226

 

PMCID: PMC3423616

 

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Hair restoration surgery: challenges and solutions

 

Paul T Rose

 

Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2015; 8: 361–370. Published online 2015 July 15. doi: 10.2147/CCID.S53980

 

PMCID: PMC4507484

 

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8.

 

Mesenchymal-epithelial interactions during hair follicle morphogenesis and cycling

 

Rachel Sennett, Michael Rendl

 

Semin Cell Dev Biol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 October 1.

 

Published in final edited form as: Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2012 October; 23(8): 917–927. Published online 2012 August 31. doi: 10.1016/j.semcdb.2012.08.011

 

PMCID: PMC3496047

 

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Sox2 in the dermal papilla niche controls hair growth by fine-tuning Bmp signaling in differentiating hair shaft progenitors

 

Carlos Clavel, Laura Grisanti, Roland Zemla, Amelie Rezza, Rita Barros, Rachel Sennett, Amin Mazloom, Chi-Yeh Chung, Xiaoqiang Cai, Chen-Leng Cai, Larysa Pevny, Silvia Nicolis, Avi Ma’ayan, Michael Rendl

 

Dev Cell. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 November 13.

 

Published in final edited form as: Dev Cell. 2012 November 13; 23(5): 981–994. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2012.10.013

 

PMCID: PMC3500526

 

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10.

 

Wnt/β-catenin signaling in dermal condensates is required for hair follicle formation

 

Su-Yi Tsai, Rachel Sennett, Amélie Rezza, Carlos Clavel, Laura Grisanti, Roland Zemla, Sara Najam, Michael Rendl

 

Dev Biol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 January 15.

 

Published in final edited form as: Dev Biol. 2014 January 15; 385(2): 179–188. Published online 2013 December 3. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2013.11.023

 

PMCID: PMC3933391

 

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11.

 

Mutations in the Cholesterol Transporter Gene ABCA5 Are Associated with Excessive Hair Overgrowth

 

Gina M. DeStefano, Mazen Kurban, Kwame Anyane-Yeboa, Claudia Dall'Armi, Gilbert Di Paolo, Heather Feenstra, Nanette Silverberg, Luis Rohena, Larissa D. López-Cepeda, Vaidehi Jobanputra, Katherine A. Fantauzzo, Maija Kiuru, Marija Tadin-Strapps, Antonio Sobrino, Anna Vitebsky, Dorothy Warburton, Brynn Levy, Julio C. Salas-Alanis, Angela M. Christiano

 

PLoS Genet. 2014 May; 10(5): e1004333. Published online 2014 May 15. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004333

 

PMCID: PMC4022463

 

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Epidermal Patterning and Induction of Different Hair Types during Mouse Embryonic Development

 

Olivier Duverger, Maria I. Morasso

 

Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2010 December 1.

 

Published in final edited form as: Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today. 2009 September; 87(3): 263–272. doi: 10.1002/bdrc.20158

 

PMCID: PMC2995294

 

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13.

 

Local circadian clock gates cell cycle progression of transient amplifying cells during regenerative hair cycling

 

Maksim V. Plikus, Christopher Vollmers, Damon de la Cruz, Amandine Chaix, Raul Ramos, Satchidananda Panda, Cheng-Ming Chuong

 

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 June 4; 110(23): E2106–E2115. Published online 2013 May 20. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1215935110

 

PMCID: PMC3677499

 

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Shh maintains dermal papilla identity and hair morphogenesis via a Noggin–Shh regulatory loop

 

Wei-Meng Woo, Hanson H. Zhen, Anthony E. Oro

 

Genes Dev. 2012 June 1; 26(11): 1235–1246. doi: 10.1101/gad.187401.112

 

PMCID: PMC3371411

 

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15.

 

Hair Follicle Plasticity with Complemented Immune-modulation Following Follicular Unit Extraction

 

Reza P Azar, Alexander H Thomas, Gerd Lindner

 

Int J Trichology. 2015 Jan-Mar; 7(1): 16–23. doi: 10.4103/0974-7753.153451

 

PMCID: PMC4387692

 

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16.

 

Fully functional hair follicle regeneration through the rearrangement of stem cells and their niches

 

Koh-ei Toyoshima, Kyosuke Asakawa, Naoko Ishibashi, Hiroshi Toki, Miho Ogawa, Tomoko Hasegawa, Tarou Irié, Tetsuhiko Tachikawa, Akio Sato, Akira Takeda, Takashi Tsuji

 

Nat Commun. 2012 April 17; 3: 784. Published online 2012 April 17. doi: 10.1038/ncomms1784

 

PMCID: PMC3337983

 

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Tooth, hair and claw: comparing epithelial stem cell niches of ectodermal appendages

 

Adrien Naveau, Kerstin Seidel, Ophir D. Klein

 

Exp Cell Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 July 15.

 

Published in final edited form as: Exp Cell Res. 2014 July 15; 325(2): 96–103. Published online 2014 February 14. doi: 10.1016/j.yexcr.2014.02.003

 

PMCID: PMC4072742

 

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18.

 

Cyclic Expression of Lhx2 Regulates Hair Formation

 

Gunilla Törnqvist, Anna Sandberg, Anna-Carin Hägglund, Leif Carlsson

 

PLoS Genet. 2010 April; 6(4): e1000904. Published online 2010 April 8. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1000904

 

PMCID: PMC2851574

 

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19.

 

“Cold” X5 Hairlaser™ used to treat male androgenic alopecia and hair growth: an uncontrolled pilot study

 

Kenneth Blum, David Han, Margaret A Madigan, Raquel Lohmann, Eric R Braverman

 

BMC Res Notes. 2014; 7: 103. Published online 2014 February 24. doi: 10.1186/1756-0500-7-103

 

PMCID: PMC3974052

 

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20.

 

Measuring environmental stress in East Greenland polar bears, 1892–1927 and 1988–2009: what does hair cortisol tell us?

 

Bechshøft TØ, FF Rigét, C Sonne, RJ Letcher, DCG Muir, MA Novak, E Henchey, JS Meyer, Eulaers, I, VLB Jaspers, M Eens, A Covaci, R Dietz

 

Environ Int. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 September 15.

 

Published in final edited form as: Environ Int. 2012 September 15; 45: 15–21. Published online 2012 May 7. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2012.04.005

 

PMCID: PMC3366040

 

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21.

 

Review of hair follicle dermal cells

 

Chao-Chun Yang, George Cotsarelis

 

J Dermatol Sci. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 January 1.

 

Published in final edited form as: J Dermatol Sci. 2010 January; 57(1): 2. doi: 10.1016/j.jdermsci.2009.11.005

 

PMCID: PMC2818774

 

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22.

 

A review of adipocyte lineage cells and dermal papilla cells in hair follicle regeneration

 

Peipei Zhang, Russell E Kling, Sudheer K Ravuri, Lauren E Kokai, J Peter Rubin, Jia-ke Chai, Kacey G Marra

 

J Tissue Eng. 2014; 5: 2041731414556850. Published online 2014 October 27. doi: 10.1177/2041731414556850

 

PMCID: PMC4221925

 

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Abnormal hair follicle development and altered cell fate of follicular keratinocytes in transgenic mice expressing ΔNp63α

 

Rose-Anne Romano, Kirsten Smalley, Song Liu, Satrajit Sinha

 

Development. 2010 May 1; 137(9): 1431–1439. doi: 10.1242/dev.045427

 

Correction in: Development. 2010 May 15; 137(10): 1775.

 

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24.

 

Signaling Involved in Hair Follicle Morphogenesis and Development

 

Pisal Rishikaysh, Kapil Dev, Daniel Diaz, Wasay Mohiuddin Shaikh Qureshi, Stanislav Filip, Jaroslav Mokry

 

Int J Mol Sci. 2014 January; 15(1): 1647–1670. Published online 2014 January 22. doi: 10.3390/ijms15011647

 

PMCID: PMC3907891

 

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25.

 

Hormones in Infant Hair at Birth Provide a Window into the Fetal Environment

 

Amita Kapoor, Gabriele Lubach, Curtis Hedman, Toni E. Ziegler, Christopher L. Coe

 

Pediatr Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 October 1.

 

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Arabidopsis Book. 2014; 12: e0172. Published online 2014 June 25. doi: 10.1199/tab.0172

 

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Estrogen Leads to Reversible Hair Cycle Retardation through Inducing Premature Catagen and Maintaining Telogen

 

Hui-min Hu, Shou-bing Zhang, Xiao-hua Lei, Zhi-li Deng, Wei-xiang Guo, Zhi-fang Qiu, Shuang Liu, Xin-yue Wang, He Zhang, En-kui Duan

 

PLoS One. 2012; 7(7): e40124. Published online 2012 July 5. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0040124

 

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Characterizing human vestibular sensory epithelia for experimental studies: new hair bundles on old tissue and implications for therapeutic interventions in ageing

 

Ruth R. Taylor, Daniel J. Jagger, Shakeel R. Saeed, Patrick Axon, Neil Donnelly, James Tysome, David Moffatt, Richard Irving, Peter Monksfield, Chris Coulson, Simon R. Freeman, Simon K. Lloyd, Andrew Forge

 

Neurobiol Aging. 2015 June; 36(6): 2068–2084. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.02.013

 

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Hear Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 March 1.

 

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The Efficacy and Safety of 17α-Estradiol (Ell-Cranell® alpha 0.025%) Solution on Female Pattern Hair Loss: Single Center, Open-Label, Non-Comparative, Phase IV Study

 

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Ann Dermatol. 2012 August; 24(3): 295–305. Published online 2012 July 25. doi: 10.5021/ad.2012.24.3.295

 

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Post-transcriptional Regulation of Keratinocyte Progenitor Cell Expansion, Differentiation and Hair Follicle Regression by miR-22

 

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PLoS Genet. 2015 May; 11(5): e1005253. Published online 2015 May 28. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1005253

 

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Over Half the Hair Cells in the Mouse Utricle First Appear After Birth, with Significant Numbers Originating from Early Postnatal Mitotic Production in Peripheral and Striolar Growth Zones

 

Joseph C. Burns, Doan On, Wendy Baker, M. Sol Collado, Jeffrey T. Corwin

 

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A historical to present-day account of efforts to answer the question, “What puts the brakes on mammalian hair cell regeneration?”

 

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Roles of the Espin Actin-Bundling Proteins in the Morphogenesis and Stabilization of Hair Cell Stereocilia Revealed in CBA/CaJ Congenic Jerker Mice

 

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PLoS Genet. 2011 March; 7(3): e1002032. Published online 2011 March 24. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002032

 

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Microfluidic Isolation of CD34-Positive Skin Cells Enables Regeneration of Hair and Sebaceous Glands In Vivo

 

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Stem Cells Transl Med. 2014 November; 3(11): 1354–1362. Published online 2014 September 9. doi: 10.5966/sctm.2014-0098

 

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FGF5 is a crucial regulator of hair length in humans

 

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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 July 22; 111(29): 10648–10653. Published online 2014 July 2. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1402862111

 

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J Invest Dermatol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 October 1.

 

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The prostamide-related glaucoma therapy, bimatoprost, offers a novel approach for treating scalp alopecias

 

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FASEB J. 2013 February; 27(2): 557–567. doi: 10.1096/fj.12-218156

 

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Pigment Cell Melanoma Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 September 10.

 

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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 December 3; 110(49): 19679–19688. Published online 2013 October 21. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1309970110

 

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Shh is required for Tabby hair follicle development

 

Chang-Yi Cui, Makoto Kunisada, Victoria Childress, Marc Michel, David Schlessinger

 

Cell Cycle. 2011 October 1; 10(19): 3379–3386. Published online 2011 October 1. doi: 10.4161/cc.10.19.17669

 

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Pflugers Arch. 2015; 467: 49–72. Published online 2014 June 25. doi: 10.1007/s00424-014-1552-9

 

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Dietary Heterogeneity among Western Industrialized Countries Reflected in the Stable Isotope Ratios of Human Hair

 

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PLoS One. 2012; 7(3): e34234. Published online 2012 March 30. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0034234

 

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Springerplus. 2014; 3: 562. Published online 2014 September 27. doi: 10.1186/2193-1801-3-562

 

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Cell proliferation follows acoustically-induced hair cell bundle loss in the zebrafish saccule

 

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Black women's hair: the main scalp dermatoses and aesthetic practices in women of African ethnicity

 

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An Bras Dermatol. 2015 Jul-Aug; 90(4): 450–465. doi: 10.1590/abd1806-4841.20152845

 

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Eps8 Regulates Hair Bundle Length and Functional Maturation of Mammalian Auditory Hair Cells

 

Valeria Zampini, Lukas Rüttiger, Stuart L. Johnson, Christoph Franz, David N. Furness, Jörg Waldhaus, Hao Xiong, Carole M. Hackney, Matthew C. Holley, Nina Offenhauser, Pier Paolo Di Fiore, Marlies Knipper, Sergio Masetto, Walter Marcotti

 

PLoS Biol. 2011 April; 9(4): e1001048. Published online 2011 April 19. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001048

 

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Wnt Signaling in Skin Development, Homeostasis, and Disease

 

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Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2013 February; 5(2): a008029. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a008029

 

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Light Microscopy of the Hair: A Simple Tool to “Untangle” Hair Disorders

 

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Int J Trichology. 2011 Jan-Jun; 3(1): 46–56. doi: 10.4103/0974-7753.82124

 

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Sterol Intermediates of Cholesterol Biosynthesis Inhibit Hair Growth and Trigger an Innate Immune Response in Cicatricial Alopecia

 

Sreejith P. Panicker, Taneeta Ganguly, Mary Consolo, Vera Price, Paradi Mirmirani, Kord Honda, Pratima Karnik

 

PLoS One. 2012; 7(6): e38449. Published online 2012 June 7. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0038449

 

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Differential Auxin-Transporting Activities of PIN-FORMED Proteins in Arabidopsis Root Hair Cells

 

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Plant Physiol. 2010 July; 153(3): 1046–1061. Published online 2010 May 3. doi: 10.1104/pp.110.156505

 

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Air motion sensing hairs of arthropods detect high frequencies at near-maximal mechanical efficiency

 

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J R Soc Interface. 2012 June 7; 9(71): 1131–1143. Published online 2011 December 14. doi: 10.1098/rsif.2011.0690

 

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Nuclear Factor I-C Regulates TGF-β-dependent Hair Follicle Cycling

 

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J Biol Chem. 2010 October 29; 285(44): 34115–34125. Published online 2010 August 21. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M110.120659

 

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The cell-cycle regulator protein 14-3-3σ is essential for hair follicle integrity and epidermal homeostasis

 

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J Invest Dermatol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2012 December 1.

 

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Architectural Niche Organization by LHX2 Is Linked to Hair Follicle Stem Cell Function

 

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Cell Stem Cell. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 December 9.

 

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Aging of the Hair Follicle Pigmentation System

 

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Int J Trichology. 2009 Jul-Dec; 1(2): 83–93. doi: 10.4103/0974-7753.58550

 

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Auxin, the organizer of the hormonal/environmental signals for root hair growth

 

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Front Plant Sci. 2013; 4: 448. Published online 2013 November 12. doi: 10.3389/fpls.2013.00448

 

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Making an Effort to Listen: Mechanical Amplification in the Ear

 

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In vivo transcriptional governance of hair follicle stem cells by canonical Wnt regulators

 

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Nat Cell Biol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 April 11.

 

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The cycling hair follicle as an ideal systems biology research model

 

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Exp Dermatol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 April 2.

 

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Smad4-dependent desmoglein-4 expression contributes to hair follicle integrity

 

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Building Epithelial Tissues from Skin Stem Cells

 

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Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2009 June 9.

 

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Hair Growth Defects in Insig-Deficient Mice Caused by Cholesterol Precursor Accumulation and Reversed by Simvastatin

 

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J Invest Dermatol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2010 November 1.

 

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A Review of Surgical Methods (Excluding Hair Transplantation) and Their Role in Hair Loss Management Today

 

Sandeep S Sattur

 

J Cutan Aesthet Surg. 2011 May-Aug; 4(2): 89–97. doi: 10.4103/0974-2077.85020

 

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Progressive alopecia reveals decreasing stem cell activation probability during aging of mice with epidermal deletion of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1)

 

Ji Li, Ting-Xin Jiang, Michael W. Hughes, Ping Wu, Randall B Widelitz, Guoping Fan, Cheng-Ming Chuong

 

J Invest Dermatol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 June 1.

 

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Clock genes, hair growth and aging

 

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Aging (Albany NY) 2010 March; 2(3): 122–128. Published online 2010 March 18.

 

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Dissecting the bulge in hair regeneration

 

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J Clin Invest. 2012 February 1; 122(2): 448–454. Published online 2012 February 1. doi: 10.1172/JCI57414

 

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The small GTPase Rac1 regulates auditory hair cell morphogenesis

 

Cynthia M. Grimsley-Myers, Conor W. Sipe, Gwenaëllle S.G. Géléoc, Xiaowei Lu

 

J Neurosci. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2010 June 16.

 

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Nfatc1 orchestrates aging in hair follicle stem cells

 

Brice E. Keyes, Jeremy P. Segal, Evan Heller, Wen-Hui Lien, Chiung-Ying Chang, Xingyi Guo, Dan S. Oristian, Deyou Zheng, Elaine Fuchs

 

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 December 17; 110(51): E4950–E4959. Published online 2013 November 26. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1320301110

 

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Automated Digital Image Analysis (TrichoScan®;) for Human Hair Growth Analysis: Ease versus Errors

 

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Int J Trichology. 2010 Jan-Jun; 2(1): 5–13. doi: 10.4103/0974-7753.66905

 

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Physiological regeneration of skin appendages and implications for regenerative medicine

 

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Physiology (Bethesda) Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 April 8.

 

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Inhibition of BMP signaling in P-Cadherin positive hair progenitor cells leads to trichofolliculoma-like hair follicle neoplasias

 

Lixin Kan, Yijie Liu, Tammy L McGuire, Michael A Bonaguidi, John A Kessler

 

J Biomed Sci. 2011; 18(1): 92. Published online 2011 December 14. doi: 10.1186/1423-0127-18-92

 

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Scalp Micropigmentation: A Concealer for Hair and Scalp Deformities

 

William R. Rassman, Jae P. Pak, Jino Kim, Norman F. Estrin

 

J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2015 March; 8(3): 35–42.

 

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Combined analysis of prenatal (maternal hair and blood) and neonatal (infant hair, cord blood and meconium) matrices to detect fetal exposure to environmental pesticides

 

Enrique M. Ostrea, Jr, Dawn M. Bielawski, Norberto C. Posecion, Jr, Melissa Corrion, Esterlita Villanueva-Uy, Rommel C. Bernardo, Yan Jin, James J. Janisse, Joel W. Ager

 

Environ Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2010 January 1.

 

Published in final edited form as: Environ Res. 2009 January; 109(1): 116–122. Published online 2008 November 18. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2008.09.004

 

PMCID: PMC2675278

 

ArticlePubReaderPDF–312KCitation

 

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Ablation of Coactivator Med1 Switches the Cell Fate of Dental Epithelia to That Generating Hair

 

Keigo Yoshizaki, Lizhi Hu, Thai Nguyen, Kiyoshi Sakai, Bing He, Chak Fong, Yoshihiko Yamada, Daniel D. Bikle, Yuko Oda

 

PLoS One. 2014; 9(6): e99991. Published online 2014 June 20. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0099991

 

PMCID: PMC4065011

 

ArticlePubReaderPDF–2.7MCitation

 

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83.

 

Afferent Neurons of the Zebrafish Lateral Line Are Strict Selectors of Hair-Cell Orientation

 

Adèle Faucherre, Jesús Pujol-Martí, Koichi Kawakami, Hernán López-Schier

 

PLoS ONE. 2009; 4(2): e4477. Published online 2009 February 18. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0004477

 

PMCID: PMC2637426

 

ArticlePubReaderPDF–2.6MCitation

 

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84.

 

Concerns Regarding Hair Cortisol as a Biomarker of Chronic Stress in Exercise and Sport Science

 

Markus Gerber, Serge Brand, Magnus Lindwall, Catherine Elliot, Nadeem Kalak, Christian Herrmann, Uwe Pühse, Ingibjörg H. Jonsdottir

 

J Sports Sci Med. 2012 December; 11(4): 571–581. Published online 2012 December 1.

 

PMCID: PMC3763301

 

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Population density-dependent hair cortisol concentrations in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

 

A.M. Dettmer, M.A. Novak, J.S. Meyer, S.J. Suomi

 

Psychoneuroendocrinology. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 April 1.

 

Published in final edited form as: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2014 April; 42: 59–67. Published online 2014 January 9. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2014.01.002

 

PMCID: PMC3959662

 

ArticlePubReaderPDF–238KCitation

 

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86.

 

Effects of Shampoo and Water Washing on Hair Cortisol Concentrations

 

Amanda F. Hamel, Jerrold S. Meyer, Elizabeth Henchey, Amanda M. Dettmer, Stephen J. Suomi, Melinda A. Novak

 

Clin Chim Acta. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2012 January 30.

 

Published in final edited form as: Clin Chim Acta. 2011 January 30; 412(3-4): 382–385. Published online 2010 October 27. doi: 10.1016/j.cca.2010.10.019

 

PMCID: PMC3023988

 

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87.

 

Mechanosensitive Hair Cell-Like Cells from Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

 

Kazuo Oshima, Kunyoo Shin, Marc Diensthuber, Anthony W. Peng, Anthony J. Ricci, Stefan Heller

 

Cell. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 May 14.

 

Published in final edited form as: Cell. 2010 May 14; 141(4): 704–716. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2010.03.035

 

PMCID: PMC2873974

 

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88.

 

Disruption of the Hedgehog Signaling Pathway Contributes to the Hair Follicle Cycling Deficiency in Vdr Knockout Mice

 

ARNAUD TEICHERT, HASHEM ELALIEH, DANIEL BIKLE

 

J Cell Physiol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 July 18.

 

Published in final edited form as: J Cell Physiol. 2010 November; 225(2): 482–489. doi: 10.1002/jcp.22227

 

PMCID: PMC4103951

 

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89.

 

Hair Cortisol Predicts Object Permanence Performance in Infant Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

 

Amanda M. Dettmer, Matthew F.S.X. Novak, Melinda A. Novak, Jerrold S. Meyer, Stephen J. Suomi

 

Dev Psychobiol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2010 December 1.

 

Published in final edited form as: Dev Psychobiol. 2009 December; 51(8): 706–713. doi: 10.1002/dev.20405

 

PMCID: PMC2797997

 

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90.

 

The 133-kDa N-terminal domain enables myosin 15 to maintain mechanotransducing stereocilia and is essential for hearing

 

Qing Fang, Artur A Indzhykulian, Mirna Mustapha, Gavin P Riordan, David F Dolan, Thomas B Friedman, Inna A Belyantseva, Gregory I Frolenkov, Sally A Camper, Jonathan E Bird

 

eLife. 2015; 4: e08627. Published online 2015 August 24. doi: 10.7554/eLife.08627

 

Includes additional comments & authors

 

PMCID: PMC4592939

 

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91.

 

Principles and mechanisms of regeneration in the mouse model for wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis

 

Xiaojie Wang, Tsai-Ching Hsi, Christian Fernando Guerrero-Juarez, Kim Pham, Kevin Cho, Catherine D. McCusker, Edwin S. Monuki, Ken W.Y. Cho, Denise L. Gay, Maksim V. Plikus

 

Regeneration (Oxf) Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 October 24.

 

Published in final edited form as: Regeneration (Oxf). 2015 August; 2(4): 169–181. Published online 2015 June 9. doi: 10.1002/reg2.38

 

PMCID: PMC4617665

 

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92.

 

Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives

 

Lauren L Levy, Jason J Emer

 

Int J Womens Health. 2013; 5: 541–556. Published online 2013 August 29. doi: 10.2147/IJWH.S49337

 

PMCID: PMC3769411

 

ArticlePubReaderPDF–4.5MCitation

 

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93.

 

Hair Evaluation Methods: Merits and Demerits

 

Rachita Dhurat, Punit Saraogi

 

Int J Trichology. 2009 Jul-Dec; 1(2): 108–119. doi: 10.4103/0974-7753.58553

 

PMCID: PMC2938572

 

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94.

 

Saccular-specific hair cell addition correlates with reproductive state-dependent changes in the auditory saccular sensitivity of a vocal fish

 

Allison B. Coffin, Robert A. Mohr, Joseph A. Sisneros

 

J Neurosci. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 February 5.

 

Published in final edited form as: J Neurosci. 2012 January 25; 32(4): 1366–1376. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4928-11.2012

 

PMCID: PMC3564634

 

ArticlePubReaderPDF–1.6MCitation

 

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95.

 

Hair penalties: the negative influence of Afrocentric hair on ratings of Black women’s dominance and professionalism

 

Tina R. Opie, Katherine W. Phillips

 

Front Psychol. 2015; 6: 1311. Published online 2015 August 31. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01311

 

PMCID: PMC4553896

 

ArticlePubReaderPDF–987KCitation

 

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96.

 

Fate of Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cells and Stereocilia after Loss of the Stereocilia

 

Shuping Jia, Shiming Yang, Weiwei Guo, David Z.Z. He

 

J Neurosci. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2010 January 2.

 

Published in final edited form as: J Neurosci. 2009 December 2; 29(48): 15277–15285. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3231-09.2009

 

PMCID: PMC2795320

 

ArticlePubReaderPDF–1.8MCitation

 

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97.

 

Morphogenetic Mechanisms in the Cyclic Regeneration of Hair Follicles and Deer Antlers from Stem Cells

 

Chunyi Li, Allan Pearson, Chris McMahon

 

Biomed Res Int. 2013; 2013: 643601. Published online 2013 December 7. doi: 10.1155/2013/643601

 

PMCID: PMC3870647

 

ArticlePubReaderPDF–7.5MCitation

 

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98.

 

Cyclic dermal BMP signaling regulates stem cell activation during hair regeneration

 

Maksim V. Plikus, Julie Mayer, Damon de la Cruz, Ruth E. Baker, Philip K. Maini, Robert Maxson, Cheng-Ming Chuong

 

Nature. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2009 June 15.

 

Published in final edited form as: Nature. 2008 January 17; 451(7176): 340–344. doi: 10.1038/nature06457

 

PMCID: PMC2696201

 

ArticlePubReaderPDF–1.3MCitation

 

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99.

 

Reactions, beliefs and concerns associated with providing hair specimens for medical research among a South African sample: a qualitative approach

 

Bronwyne Coetzee, Ashraf Kagee, Mark Tomlinson, Louise Warnich, Ogechi Ikediobi

 

Future Virol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 September 1.

 

Published in final edited form as: Future Virol. 2012 November 1; 7(11): 1135–1142. doi: 10.2217/fvl.12.100

 

PMCID: PMC3640774

 

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100.

 

Macroenvironmental Regulation of Hair Cycling and Collective Regenerative Behavior

 

Maksim V. Plikus, Cheng-Ming Chuong

 

Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 April 2.

 

Published in final edited form as: Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med. 2014 January; 4(1): a015198. Published online 2014 January 1. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a015198

 

PMCID: PMC3869280

 

ArticlePubReaderPDF–1.7MCitation

 

CAUSES OF HAIR LOSS

Posted on December 28, 2015 at 10:35 AM Comments comments (0)

Causes of hair loss and the developments in hair rejuvenation.

Rushton DH1, Norris MJ, Dover R, Busuttil N.

Author information

Abstract

Hair is considered to be a major component of an individual's general appearance. The psychological impact of hair loss results in a measurably detrimental change in self-esteem and is associated with images of reduced worth. It is not surprising that both men and women find hair loss a stressful experience. Genetic hair loss is the major problem affecting men and by the age of 50, up to 50% will be affected. Initial attempts to regenerate the lost hair have centred on applying a topical solution of between 2% to 5% minoxidil; however, the results proved disappointing. Recently, finasteride, a type II 5alpha reductase inhibitor has been found to regrow a noticeable amount of hair in about 40% of balding men. Further developments in treatments have lead to the use of a dual type I and type II inhibitor where 90% of those treated regrow a noticeable amount of hair. In women the major cause of hair loss before the age of 50 is nutritional, with 30% affected. Increased and persistent hair shedding (chronic telogen effluvium) and reduced hair volume are the principle changes occurring. The main cause appears to be depleted iron stores, compromised by a suboptimal intake of the essential amino acid l-lysine. Correction of these imbalances stops the excessive hair loss and returns the hair back to its former glory. However, it can take many months to redress the situation.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18498491


 

Diagnosing and treating hair loss.

Mounsey AL1, Reed SW.

Author information

Abstract

Physicians should be careful not to underestimate the emotional impact of hair loss for some patients. Patients may present with focal patches of hair loss or more diffuse hair loss, which may include predominant hair thinning or increased hair shedding. Focal hair loss can be further broken down into scarring and nonscarring. Scarring alopecia is best evaluated by a dermatologist. The cause of focal hair loss may be diagnosed by the appearance of the patch and examination for fungal agents. A scalp biopsy may be necessary if the cause of hair loss is unclear. Alopecia areata presents with smooth hairless patches, which have a high spontaneous rate of resolution. Tinea capitis causes patches of alopecia that may be erythematous and scaly. Male and female pattern hair losses have recognizable patterns and can be treated with topical minoxidil, and also with finasteride in men. Sudden loss of hair is usually telogen effluvium, but can also be diffuse alopecia areata. In telogen effluvium, once the precipitating cause is removed, the hair will regrow.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19678603

 

Abstract

Hair loss (alopecia) affects men and women of all ages and often significantly affects social and psychologic well-being. Although alopecia has several causes, a careful history, dose attention to the appearance of the hair loss, and a few simple studies can quickly narrow the potential diagnoses. Androgenetic alopecia, one of the most common forms of hair loss, usually has a specific pattern of temporal-frontal loss in men and central thinning in women. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved topical minoxidil to treat men and women, with the addition of finasteride for men. Telogen effluvium is characterized by the loss of "handfuls" of hair, often following emotional or physical stressors. Alopecia areata, trichotillomania, traction alopecia, and tinea capitis have unique features on examination that aid in diagnosis. Treatment for these disorders and telogen effluvium focuses on resolution of the underlying cause.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12887115

 

Diffuse hair loss in an adult female: approach to diagnosis and management.

Shrivastava SB1.

Author information

Abstract

Telogen effluvium (TE) is the most common cause of diffuse hair loss in adult females. TE, along with female pattern hair loss (FPHL) and chronic telogen effluvium (CTE), accounts for the majority of diffuse alopecia cases. Abrupt, rapid, generalized shedding of normal club hairs, 2-3 months after a triggering event like parturition, high fever, major surgery, etc. indicates TE, while gradual diffuse hair loss with thinning of central scalp/widening of central parting line/frontotemporal recession indicates FPHL. Excessive, alarming diffuse shedding coming from a normal looking head with plenty of hairs and without an obvious cause is the hallmark of CTE, which is a distinct entity different from TE and FPHL. Apart from complete blood count and routine urine examination, levels of serum ferritin and T3, T4, and TSH should be checked in all cases of diffuse hair loss without a discernable cause, as iron deficiency and thyroid hormone disorders are the two common conditions often associated with diffuse hair loss, and most of the time, there are no apparent clinical features to suggest them. CTE is often confused with FPHL and can be reliably differentiated from it through biopsy which shows a normal histology in CTE and miniaturization with significant reduction of terminal to vellus hair ratio (T:V < 4:1) in FPHL. Repeated assurance, support, and explanation that the condition represents excessive shedding and not the actual loss of hairs, and it does not lead to baldness, are the guiding principles toward management of TE as well as CTE. TE is self limited and resolves in 3-6 months if the trigger is removed or treated, while the prognosis of CTE is less certain and may take 3-10 years for spontaneous resolution. Topical minoxidil 2% with or without antiandrogens, finestride, hair prosthesis, hair cosmetics, and hair surgery are the therapeutically available options for FPHL management.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19172026


 

Chronic telogen effluvium: increased scalp hair shedding in middle-aged women.

Whiting DA1.

Author information

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Diffuse loss of scalp hair is a common problem in middle-aged women. A segment of these cases represents idiopathic chronic telogen effluvium (CTE).

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose was to establish distinctive clinical and pathologic criteria for the diagnosis of CTE to facilitate its differentiation from androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and systemic causes of chronic diffuse hair loss.

METHODS:

A group of 355 patients (346 females, 9 males) with diffuse generalized thinning of scalp hair of unknown origin were classified as having CTE and were included in the study. Characteristically they presented with a history of hair loss with both increased shedding and thinning of abrupt onset and fluctuating course and showed diffuse thinning of hair all over the scalp, frequently accompanied by bitemporal recession. Two 4 mm punch biopsy specimens were taken mostly from the mid or posterior parietal scalp of these patients. The biopsies were performed at these same areas in 412 patients with AGA (193 male, 219 female). Similar paired biopsy specimens were also taken from 22 normal control subjects (13 males, nine females). Specimens were sectioned horizontally and vertically and were examined for terminal and velluslike (miniaturized) hairs, follicular stelae, follicular units, and perifollicular inflammation and fibrosis.

RESULTS:

In horizontal sections of 4 mm punch biopsy specimens from patients with CTE the average number of hairs was 39, the terminal/velluslike hair ratio was 9:1, 89% of the terminal hairs were in anagen, and 11% were in telogen. In AGA these values were 35, 1.9:1, 83.2%, and 16.8%, respectively, and in normal control subjects 40, 7:1, 93.5%, and 6.5%, respectively. Significant degrees of inflammation and fibrosis were present in only 10% to 12% of cases of CTE and normal controls, but occurred in 37% of cases of AGA. CTE ran a prolonged and fluctuating course in many patients.

CONCLUSION:

CTE, which usually affects 30- to 60-year-old women, starts abruptly with or without a recognizable initiating factor. It may be distinguished from classic acute telogen effluvium by its long fluctuating course and from AGA by its clinical and histologic findings.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8959948

Intranasal Oxytocin Administration Dampens Amygdala Reactivity towards Emotional Faces in Male and Female PTSD Patients.

Posted on November 22, 2015 at 5:25 PM Comments comments (0)

Intranasal Oxytocin Administration Dampens Amygdala Reactivity towards Emotional Faces in Male and Female PTSD Patients.

Koch SB1,2, van Zuiden M1, Nawijn L1,2, Frijling JL1,2, Veltman DJ3, Olff M1,4.

Author information

Abstract

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling psychiatric disorder. As a substantial part of PTSD patients responds poorly to currently available psychotherapies, pharmacological interventions boosting treatment response are needed. Because of its anxiolytic and pro-social properties, the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has been proposed as promising strategy for treatment augmentation in PTSD. As a first step to investigate the therapeutic potential of OT in PTSD, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over functional MRI study examining OT administration effects (40 IU) on amygdala reactivity toward emotional faces in unmedicated male and female police officers with (n=37, 21 males) and without (n=40, 20 males) PTSD. Trauma-exposed controls were matched to PTSD patients based on age, sex, years of service and educational level. Under placebo, the expected valence-dependent amygdala reactivity (ie, greater activity toward fearful-angry faces compared with happy-neutral faces) was absent in PTSD patients. OT administration dampened amygdala reactivity toward all emotional faces in male and female PTSD patients, but enhanced amygdala reactivity in healthy male and female trauma-exposed controls, independent of sex and stimulus valence. In PTSD patients, greater anxiety prior to scanning and amygdala reactivity during the placebo session were associated with greater reduction of amygdala reactivity after OT administration. Taken together, our results indicate presumably beneficial neurobiological effects of OT administration in male and female PTSD patients. Future studies should investigate OT administration in clinical settings to fully appreciate its therapeutic potential.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 28 October 2015; doi:10.1038/npp.2015.299.

A Meeting of Hearts and Minds

Posted on September 17, 2015 at 2:55 PM Comments comments (0)


By Hara Estroff Marano


Every cell of the brain and the heart is held together by a membrane that is rich in fat. Studies show that fish oils -- rich in omega-3 fatty acids -- may be as effective as conventional drugs in alleviating unipolar and bipolar depression. And they reduce the risk of heart disease.

 

We often think that the heart and the mind are on separate paths.

But there’s at least one issue on which they are united—the

value of omega-3 fatty acids.

 

There is a growing group of scientists who believe that depression

and heart disease could have a common cause—a diet that lacks

omega-3 fatty acids. So far, the evidence is fairly circumstantial. For

one thing, the twentieth century saw a parallel rise in both heart

disease and depression.

 

For another, depression and heart disease commonly co-exist.

Scientists now know that depression leads to heart disease, raising the

risk fivefold, and it more than triples the risk of fatal cardiac events

in those with existing heart disease. And heart disease commonly leads to

depression.

 

Every cell of your brain, like every cell of your heart, and every

other cell of the body, is held together by a membrane that is rich in

fat. All communication with and between nerve cells takes place through

this fat rich membrane, or envelope.

 

What’s more, the brain is unique in that its cells have long

arms extending to other parts of the brain and body, enabling the rich

network of communication between cells that underlies such complex

experiences as feelings, thoughts, memories, learning and

movement of all kinds. Each of these extensions is sheathed in a membrane

rich in fat, which acts as a kind of electrical insulation maintaining

the integrity of signals as they pass from one nerve cell to the

next.

 

Scientists estimate that two thirds of the brain is made of fatty

acids. These come directly from the food we eat.

 

Omega-3s are a specific kind of polyunsaturated fat. This type of

fat keeps cell membranes fluid and flexible. As a result cells are better

able to receive signals, making the brain’s and the heart’s

operations more stable.

 

And brain cells are better able to withstand the constant assault

of free radicals of oxygen given off by the intense activity that takes

place there. In other words, omega-3 fats help to conserve brain energy

and help us maintain mental balance.

 

Studies show that fish oils may be as effective as conventional

drugs in alleviating unipolar and bipolar depression. And they reduce the

risk of heart disease.

 

But how much omega-3 fat is enough? The American Heart Association

recommends at least two servings of fish per week to get cardiovascular

benefits. A three-ounce serving of farmed Atlantic salmon has about 1,500

mg of omega-3 fat. Fish is the recommended source of omega-3s because

only marine life contains eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic

acid (DHA), the two most accessible forms of the fats. A diet that draws

on fish is likely a diet that cuts down on steak, cheese and other

sources of unhealthy saturated fats.

 

No one knows whether there is an ideal balance of EPA and DHA and

exactly what it is. In fact, it may be different for different purposes.

It’s way too soon to know for sure, but some studies suggest that

depression may benefit more from intake of EPA, while the balance of DHA

and EPA seems especially to affect heart disease.

 

A safe starting point may be the proportions you get by eating

fish—two to three times as much EPA as DHA. A third form of

omega-3s, called alpha-linolenic acid (LNA), found in flax seeds and

leafy plants, is useful because the body can convert it into EPA and DHA.

But the conversion process is slow, and the same mechanism converts parts

of soybean, corn and safflower oils into inflammatory omega-6s, which

most Americans already consume in abundance. The production of EPA and

DHA could be stymied if your body is already occupied processing

omega-6.

 

Several factors control the amount of omega-3 available for use in

the body: the amount of EPA and DHA in your diet, how much is converted

from LNA and how much omega-6 your body is producing.

 

Where can you find omega-3s? They’re most abundant in fish

like tuna, mackerel, herring, salmon and sardines. The smaller the fatty

fish, the better, because the lower down a creature is on the food chain,

the lower the concentration of toxic minerals that has accumulated in the

fat. Omega-3s are also in walnuts and flaxseeds.

 

And, increasingly, they’re on your grocer’s shelf. From

eggs to salad dressing to waffles, food manufacturers are rushing to

market a variety of products fortified with omega-3s.

 

Wherever you find them, omega-3s are one place where your heart and

mind are one.


https://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/200405/meeting-hearts-and-minds

Quiet the Mind to Open the Heart (Part 2)

Posted on September 17, 2015 at 2:50 PM Comments comments (0)


 

Marilyn Mitchell M.D. Marilyn Mitchell M.D.

Heart and Soul Healing


There are two ways of experiencing life: Mind and Heart

 

We experience life through the dualities of Mind and Heart. I hope to show you how to get in the habit of making them one.

 

If you want to experience this vast place, be with a baby and feel your heart open. Babies are pure presence and heart. They are relaxed, in the moment, and have not yet developed mind commentary. Just being in the presence of a baby has a powerful effect on us. These little preverbal beings emanate such a strong heart vibration that we tend to match their vibration and resonate with Heart.

 

Sometimes it takes a while to relearn things we’ve known all along. For the first 21 years of my career as a physician, I was an obstetrician. I loved being an obstetrician, helping babies into the world and then being able to feel that vast heart opening every time in the newborn’s presence. Later when my own 2 children were born, I had little wise heart teachers with me in daily life. While they were still preverbal, they communicated only from the Heart place. They would capture my attention and cause me to feel love and expansion. My mind was quiet. Time stood still. It was through observing my own babies as they developed that I began to see the distinction between Mind and Heart. Very early, young children have a drive to develop language and communicate with those around them. As we begin to speak, our logical Mind starts to take over and we lose touch with the Heart place. I stumbled into reopening the Heart door as a teenager.

 

When I was 18, I decided I would learn to meditate. It was the 70’s—days of peace, love, rock music, and meditation. Transcendental Meditation. Go to a workshop, receive a mantra and experience health, focus, and calm with just 15 minutes of practice twice a day. That was the promise. I was a driven, over-achieving student at the time, and prided myself on my peaceful exterior persona. Since I was headed off to college, meditation sounded like the perfect tool for cultivating that persona while succeeding academically. I signed up for a workshop.

 

On the day of the workshop, as I registered and took my seat in the lecture hall, something began to stir in me. I had a sense of excitement and anticipation that surprised me. I had no idea what to expect, but somehow I resonated with the people who were running the workshop, and giving the lecture: they all had a sense of calm that was palpable. I listened to their words and the stories they told about people who had changed their lives with meditation, but it was something beyond the words that was connecting with me, stirring me. I wanted what they had.

 

After the lecture we waited to go into a small dimly-lit room where we would be given a mantra. When it was my turn, I dutifully went into the room, sat in the chair, and had a mantra whispered in my ear. I started slowly, silently repeating the mantra in my head, over and over, sinking into the chair. My breathing slowed and became rhythmic and deep. And then, I felt all of my muscles let go and relax, muscles I didn’t even know I had. Apparently, I had been holding a low level of continuous tension in my body that I wasn’t even aware of until it let go. What a relief. Each step of this process happened so gently and organically. My mind was following all this in a quiet state of wonder. And, finally, miracle of miracles, my mind commentary stopped. I found myself in an amazing expanded silence and sense of peace that felt bigger, greater than my mind. I had never realized that my mind had been continually talking, commenting, instructing. Until it stopped. What a relief. I felt as if I had stepped through a doorway into a vast peaceful place where I was expanded and connected to everything through a scintillating energy. I had left my mind at the door, silent, observing.

 

At the time, I didn’t realize that I had gone through all the steps to quiet the mind and open the heart: give the mind a simple, repetitive focus, breathe fully and rhythmically, relax physically, and gently allow the door to open. I did not realize what I would learn later as a doctor and a healer: that this Heart place could be tapped for profound insight and healing in serious or unremitting illnesses. At 18, I just enjoyed the feeling when my mind stopped its chatter, and I thought of this as the ultimate way to relax. I was grateful to have discovered this peaceful place to go.

 

This was the first time that I had an awareness of my mind separate from the peaceful part of my being. I continued to practice my meditation, and it was helpful. I became more calm and focused. But as soon as I would open my eyes after meditation, my mind would begin again with the “to do” list and the commentary.

 

There are two ways of experiencing life: Mind and Heart.

 

The first step is to become aware of our mind chatter, by getting relief from it. Then we can get in touch with our inner world. The next step is to cultivate the heart and train the mind to be still until it is needed to serve our greater self.

 

Susan’s Meditation: My friend Susan who teaches meditation speaks about the relief from stress offered by meditation. She mentioned that meditation is first a practice to quiet the “monkey mind”, which allow us to have rapt attention to the person we are with. This, she says, I the highest form of love. Rapt attention, I thought. Yes, and the highest form of this practice is to cultivate rapt attention for oneself—listening to our own heart, the greatest form of love.


https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/heart-and-soul-healing/201208/quiet-the-mind-open-the-heart-part-2

Research: Pomegranate May Reverse Blocked Arteries

Posted on September 16, 2015 at 1:35 PM Comments comments (0)

While technically a berry, pomegranate "fruit" may be nature's answer to turning the tide against the #1 cause of death in the industrialized world: heart disease. Let's start with what it tells us simply through experiencing it...

 

Pomegranate has a remarkable astringency, giving your mouth and gums that dry, puckering mouth feel. This cleansing sensation is technically caused, as with all astringents, by shrinking and disinfecting your mucous membranes.

 

Anyone who drinks pomegranate juice, or is lucky enough to eat one fresh, can understand why it is so effective at cleansing the circulatory system. Nature certainly planted enough poetic visual clues there for us: its juice looks like blood, and it does resemble a multi-chambered heart, at least when you consider its appearance in comparison to most other fruits.

 

But sometimes the obvious (in appearance and effect) is not compelling enough – certainly not for the hyper-rational, "evidence-based" folks in positions of medical and regulatory power today – so we have science to lend additional support and credibility, and perhaps even keep some of us from being fined or going to jail for stating the obvious, e.g. "This juice may be beneficial to your health."

 

Indeed, your mouth and your arteries are lined with the same cell type: epithelial cells. Together, they make up the epithelium, one of four basic tissue types within animals, along with connective tissue, muscle tissue and nervous tissue, and which comprises the interior walls of the entire circulatory system. So, when you feel that amazing cleansing effect in your mouth, this is in fact akin to what your circulatory system – and the epithelium/endothelium lining the inside of your veins and arteries – "feels" as well. How do we know this for sure?

 

Carotid Artery Stenosis

 

A remarkable study, published in the journal Clinical Nutrition, took 10 patients with atherosclerosis and measured their carotid arteries before and after one year of supplementing their diet with pomegranate juice. After one year, the plaque clogging their carotid arteries was reduced by up to 30%, while the control group's blockages increased by 9% - effectively reversing the disease process by up to 39% within one year. Additional "side benefits" included a 130% increase in their antioxidant status, with LDL susceptibility to oxidation (it is far more important to maintain the quality of the LDL, i.e. keep it from getting damaged, than to nit-pick about the "right number") being reduced 59%. Finally, systolic blood pressure was reduced 21% within the first year. Wow, right? But it only gets better....

 

Pomegranate actually has been studied to possess therapeutic properties in over 80 diseases or disease symptoms. You can view the entire spectrum of studies on our ("our" meaning yours too, as we are open access) Pomegranate Research Page.................. http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/can-pomegranate-keep-you-going-under-knife